DSM provides low/no sugar insight

1 Jul 2015

DSM has published the latest in its series of Global Insights market surveys. In this latest report, the company unveils consumer attitudes to low-sugar and no-sugar foods and drinks based on interviews with 5,000 people over the age of 18 who purchase or consume low-sugar or no-sugar food and beverages. This included 1,000 participants in […]

DSM provides low/no sugar insight

stevia-24718154DSM has published the latest in its series of Global Insights market surveys. In this latest report, the company unveils consumer attitudes to low-sugar and no-sugar foods and drinks based on interviews with 5,000 people over the age of 18 who purchase or consume low-sugar or no-sugar food and beverages. This included 1,000 participants in each of five countries: France, the United States, Argentina, Mexico and Australia. Participants were asked about the knowledge and preferences for sweeteners and sugar content as well as the factors that motivate them to choose no sugar/low sugar options.

The survey shows that almost two-thirds of consumers are concerned about excess sugar – but the way respondents say they opt to reduce their intake of sweetened products varies dramatically, having far-reaching implications for future product development.

The survey data suggest that consumers seeking to limit sugar intake do not take a one-size-fits-all approach to purchasing decisions for the different foods and beverages they consume. More than twice as many (41% vs 20%) have opted for a sugar-free carbonated soft drink versus a sugar-free juice and, while 40% have chosen a low-sugar yogurt, just 20% have opted for a sugar-free version of the flavoured yogurt.

The report concludes that consumer interest in low- and no-sugar products is high in all markets surveyed and the awareness of the health implications of too much sugar is significant and increasing, especially in the emerging consumer markets. The popularity of low- and no-sugar options demonstrates that consumers still want to be able to enjoy sweet-tasting drinks and snacks although their perceived buying behaviour varies quite substantially per category.

Replacing sugar poses different challenges for different categories in different markets – as well as for the companies producing these new ingredients. Leading food and beverage companies around the world are looking to broaden their toolkit to customise the sweet-taste profile and other characteristics of their products to their specific target group in their specific market. The other challenge is up to the ingredients industry – to provide manufacturers with innovative ingredients to help them meet this expanding consumer demand.

Understanding what drives this aspect of different decision making per category may hold promise for manufacturers launching products that offer no-sugar options in low-sugar strongholds and vice versa, DSM points out.

The full report is available from the DSM website.