Globesity. We have the technology – what’s the missing ingredient?

16 Nov 2015

Obesity, fat’s new frontier – 1 billion people will be obese by 2030. The world is getting fatter faster. Fat is being labelled the new tobacco…. It’s sugar, it’s fat, it’s when they are both combined, or it’s chemistry or pharmacy, social or economic reasons or other health problems – I’m depressed.  The debate continues…

Untitled Document

Overall social attitudes towards diets and healthy lifestyles today do not reflect the vast benefits available from what research and science into food ingredients has made possible. Despite research success over the last 20 years, is there a missing ingredient? Is this yet another fancy idea or can our emotions, feelings and higher levels of consciousness or vibrations possibly influence the manufacturing and consuming process?


Intuition, inspiration or inner guidance can direct us to food that has vitality. However, through instinct, hunger habit or craving, the scope of diet is always limited to the food that we actually eat. We can know that mentally, but knowing through our body is a more certain way to improve our physical being.


A food can be termed anti-life (unhealthy) in two ways: when it changes the natural process of how our bodies function in good health, diminishing healthy functioning, or, alternatively when a food from which life has been extracted through over-processing or other modifications is effectively lifeless or dead.


Inanimate or defunct foods alter our metabolism, sleeping patterns, alertness, ability to concentrate, quality of emotion, and ability to maintain an even keel. The main culprits or offenders are: refined sugar, caffeine, alcohol, white flour, toxic substances even in small amounts, preservatives, chemicals, and pesticides – they make the body work in ways it is not accustomed to. Also, trace elements do not occur in the body naturally and therefore cannot be processed or metabolised. Any alterations to foods such as canning, heating, or refining has literally boiled, pressed, drained, or compressed the life out of them.



To love our bodies is to give ourselves food that contains life: vital foods that are natural and whole rather than lifeless and dead. The higher its vibrational frequency, its “vibe”, the higher the energy food has and the more alive it is. Vegetarian, vegan, hydration, and raw add to vibes. Organic, local and fresh contain more life force. Eating in season means being in tune with natural cycles of the earth and can be infused with loving intent.


There is some evidence of these activities on a small scale. The real question is - can these choices and this transformation be made by the manufacturing plant/outlets, and then subsequently by the end consumer?

Charles Faulkner, Editor , Nutraceuticals Now

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