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ABA slams energy drink report

13 Jan 2015

In response to a report on energy drinks released by U.S. Senators Markey, Blumenthal and Durbin, the American Beverage Association issued the following statement: “Energy drinks have been enjoyed safely by millions of people around the world for more than 25 years, and in the U.S. for more than 15 years.  Energy drinks, their ingredients […]

ABA slams energy drink report

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-images-energy-drink-image15632059In response to a report on energy drinks released by U.S. Senators Markey, Blumenthal and Durbin, the American Beverage Association issued the following statement:

“Energy drinks have been enjoyed safely by millions of people around the world for more than 25 years, and in the U.S. for more than 15 years.  Energy drinks, their ingredients and labelling are regulated by the FDA, and, like most consumer products, their advertising is subject to oversight from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.

This report ignores crucial data about energy drinks and caffeine consumption in the U.S.  Based on the most recent government data reported in the journal Pediatrics, children under 12 have virtually no caffeine consumption from energy drinks.  This study’s findings are consistent with an analysis commissioned by FDA and updated in 2012, as well as a published ILSI survey of more than 37,000 people which shows that caffeine consumption in the U.S. has remained stable during the most recent period analysed, while coffee remains the primary source of caffeine in most age groups.

Leading energy drink manufacturers voluntarily go far beyond all federal requirements when it comes to labelling and education. In fact, ABA member companies voluntarily display total caffeine content – from all sources – on their packages along with advisory statements indicating that the product is not recommended for children, pregnant or nursing women and persons sensitive to caffeine.  They also have voluntarily pledged not to market these products to children or sell them in K-12 schools. These guidelines and more are noted in the ABA Guidance on the Responsible Labeling and Marketing of Energy Drinks.”

Additional Background:

On Caffeine:

Most mainstream energy drinks contain about half as much caffeine as a similar sized cup of coffeehouse coffee.

Caffeine has been safely consumed, in a variety of foods and beverages, around the world for hundreds of years.

A vast body of available and reliable science supports the safety of caffeine, including at the levels found in mainstream energy drinks.

 

 

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