ISA supports World Diabetes Day

18 Nov 2016

The International Sweeteners Association (ISA )has again stood by the efforts of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) to raise awareness of diabetes prevention and management, by supporting World Diabetes Day.

ISA supports World Diabetes Day

The International Sweeteners Association (ISA )has again stood by the efforts of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) to raise awareness of diabetes prevention and management, by supporting World Diabetes Day, which took place on November 14, with targeted and engaging activation and materials, this time with the valuable scientific support of the European Specialist Dietetic Network (ESDN) for Diabetes of the European Federation of the Associations of Dietitians (EFAD).

Adhering to this year’s theme “Eyes on Diabetes”1, which promotes the importance of screening in early diagnosis and treatment of type 2 diabetes in order to reduce the risk of serious complications like retinopathy, the ISA developed an integrated online programme that communicates the importance of a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle and the value that starting with simple steps can bring towards living a healthier life to prevent, or manage, type 2 diabetes and its complications.

The core of this activity programme consists of an infographic and an animated video, which under the umbrella theme “It’s easy to start with one simple step!” explain the importance of getting small, everyday choices right in order to help people live a healthier life with diabetes without complications. The fundamental aim of this ISA online campaign is also to address in a creative and informative way the key lifestyle and dietary guidelines for people with diabetes, including the role low calorie sweeteners can play in helping manage blood glucose levels as a safe option to enjoy sweet taste without calories and most importantly without affecting blood glucose and insulin3.

“We have good news to share: type 2 diabetes can be preventable or even reversed if diagnosed at an early stage, and lifestyle including dietary changes are implemented,” said Dr Aimilia Papakonstantinou, lecturer on nutrition and metabolism at the Agricultural University of Athens, Greece, and chair of the EFAD’s ESDN for Diabetes. “Dietitians have an integral role to play in educating people how to follow the dietary guidelines and in developing an individualized nutrition therapy program for people with diabetes.”

Papakonstantinou said that, in the context of an overall healthy dietary plan, low calorie sweeteners can be part of the diet of people with diabetes and provide them with a greater variety of sweet-tasting products with less sugars and calories, while helping them to manage sugar and energy intake.