Flexitarianism spurs the rise of meat-plant blends

11 Apr 2020

Plant-based eating is a major trend, but while consumers may want to increase plant consumption, most are not willing to shun meat entirely. Now, a growing number of manufacturers is introducing products that combine the best of both.

According to Swiss investment firm UBS, the global value of plant-based meat alternatives grew to $4.5 billion by 2018, and it expects this to rise to $85 billion by 2030 – but in Europe and North America, plant-based foods are not yet replacing a large amount of meat. Nevertheless, numerous surveys suggest consumers want to cut back, and are trying to include more plant-based foods in their diets, such as grains, legumes and vegetables.

Flexitarianism spurs the rise of meat-plant blends
Plant-based eating is a major trend - but most consumers also want meat

Hormel Foods’ Applegate brand is the latest to enter the market with a range of blended burgers, which could appeal to this dichotomy. Its new products are based on a mix of either organic beef with cauliflower, spinach, lentils and butternut squash, or organic turkey with sweet potato, great northern beans, kale and roasted onion. Later this year, it intends to launch two varieties of blended meatballs, with pork or turkey and vegetables mixed with rice or lentils respectively.

The blended products follow on from other launches, such as Debbie and Andrew’s Flexilicious brand in the UK, which makes a variety of beef sausages with 40% beef, blended with vegetables and legumes, and in the US, Raised and Rooted blended burgers from Tyson Foods and Perdue’s blended chicken and vegetable nuggets, tenders and patties.

But while the blended sector is doing something new in its overt marketing of such products, the concept of blending meat and vegetarian ingredients has been around for years.

So-called meat extenders traditionally have been used to cut the costs associated with meat ingredients, but this is no longer manufacturers’ only concern. Soy-based binders and fillers were formerly among the most common vegetarian ingredients for blended products – and especially low-fat commercial meat products – but nutritional quality and taste now are coming to the fore, with manufacturers turning to other pulses and lower protein ingredients like cereal grains and vegetables, as well as cheeses for flavour.

Nutrition is a major driver. Pea specialist Roquette, for instance, is tapping into the trend with pea fibre that can be injected into whole muscle meat to create a tenderer, juicier steak, or used in minced meat or emulsified products. Along with a range of ingredients like lupine, fava beans, wheat and rice, peas and other pulses and grains are able to cut the saturated fat content of meat while also making it more succulent.

Scelta Mushrooms provides another option with mushroom ingredients intended for use in traditional burger patties to add juiciness, and to improve nutritional profile and flavour while cutting costs.

At the moment, the blended meat concept is most well-established in the United States, but it is taking off in Europe as well. As more consumers look for ways to enjoy more plant-based foods without necessarily giving up meat, the space also avoids the technical challenges of using plant ingredients exclusively to mimic the taste and texture of meat, offering consumers a tasty – and potentially healthier and more environmentally friendly – alternative to traditional meat.

Related news

Lidl Cheddar cheese shows rising popularity of carbon neutral food

Lidl Cheddar cheese shows rising popularity of carbon neutral food

31 May 2021

Hard discounter Lidl will launch a carbon-neutral Cheddar cheese in UK stores before the end of the year. Are carbon neutral products the next big thing in sustainable food?

Read more 
Access in the spotlight this World Hunger Day

Access in the spotlight this World Hunger Day

21 May 2021

The Hunger Project has made huge progress in reducing global hunger, but Covid-19 has worsened poverty and limited food availability in many communities. This World Hunger Day, the focus is on access – to food, but also to essential resources like educ...

Read more 
US sugary drinks tax could be on the cards

US sugary drinks tax could be on the cards

17 May 2021

A federal excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages could be on the cards in the US as a Democrat lawmaker announces plans to resurrect the SWEET Act, which proposes a tiered tax.

Read more 
Brazilian regulators open the door to supplement and probiotic innovation

Brazilian regulators open the door to supplement and probiotic innovation

1 Feb 2021

Health claim approvals for dietary supplements and probiotics in Brazil are opening the door to market innovation, says one expert – but more work is needed to ensure full consumer transparency.

Read more 
Singapore start-up ‘makes bad carbs good’ with plant-based fibre blends

Singapore start-up ‘makes bad carbs good’ with plant-based fibre blends

25 Jan 2021

Alchemy Fibre makes plant-based fibre blends that lower the glycaemic index (GI) of refined carbohydrates without altering their taste, texture or colour.

Read more 
Is it time European policymakers define what ‘natural’ food is?

Is it time European policymakers define what ‘natural’ food is?

18 Jan 2021

Consumers are being misled over products that claim to be natural but contain artificial ingredients. Is it time for a legal definition?

Read more 
Veggie-packed food brands fill the gap between ‘plant-based’ and ‘vegetable-rich’

Veggie-packed food brands fill the gap between ‘plant-based’ and ‘vegetable-rich’

11 Jan 2021

Generation Z – the generation of people born between 1997 and 2012 – may be fuelling the plant-based food trend but, paradoxically, they are not eating enough plants, creating a white space for products and ready meals that put vegetables centre-stage.

Read more 
Halal harmonisation opens doors for food exporters

Halal harmonisation opens doors for food exporters

14 Dec 2020

The food industry is benefitting from steps to harmonise halal standards globally, including recent guidance for halal food additives– but more progress is required, according to a report.

Read more 
Immune-boosting product launches in Southeast Asia

Immune-boosting product launches in Southeast Asia

7 Dec 2020

Chocolate snacks with adaptogenic mushroom powder, vitamin C jelly, and prebiotic-packed crackers are just some recent product launches in Southeast Asia promising to boost consumers’ immunity as the COVID-19 pandemic drags on.

Read more 
Chinese consumers increasingly concerned about food safety

Chinese consumers increasingly concerned about food safety

30 Nov 2020

Food safety is of growing concern for Chinese consumers and many do not fully trust on-pack claims such as organic. Supply chain certification is one way to win back trust, according to Lloyd’s Register.

Read more