Egg substitutes driven by vegan, allergen-free demand

13 Nov 2018

Egg replacers have long been used as a way to avoid to the price fluctuations often associated with real eggs, but recently interest has been driven by manufacturer demand for clean label and plant-based ingredients, allowing companies to make more vegan and allergen-free claims.

Egg substitutes driven by vegan, allergen-free demand

Industry sometimes has been reluctant to use egg alternatives because of potential issues with their taste, texture and functionality in finished products when compared with real eggs. But rising interest in vegan and plant-based ingredients has encouraged a growing number of manufacturers to take eggs out of their product formulations. In addition, factors such as product recalls linked to salmonella contamination, as well as the generally lower cost of substitute ingredients, add up to a buoyant market.

According to a report from ResearchAndMarkets, the global egg replacement ingredients market is set to grow 5.7% a year from 2017 to 2022, to reach a value of US$1.2 billion by 2022. Typical applications for egg replacers include baked goods, as well as sauces, condiments and creamy dressings.

Many of the available egg replacers are blends, such as the range from Corbion Caravan, which aims to tap into demand for dairy-free ingredients in cakes and chemically leavened batters. Its egg replacers are made from specialised whey proteins, gums, enzymes and emulsifiers, which could replace 50%-100% of eggs or egg whites.

However, such blends often lead to longer ingredient lists, and many companies wanting to tap into demand for clean labels now are looking at simpler alternatives that could be perceived as more natural, such as aquafaba, the liquid drained from canned chickpeas, which has excellent foaming properties, or fibres made from dried citrus pulp.

Fiberstar Inc says its ingredient line – based on dried orange pulp – can be used to replace not just eggs, but also oils, fats, stabilisers and emulsifiers. In sauces, the company says it is possible to switch out both egg and soy lecithin, for example, as a clean label, allergen-free alternative. Other egg alternatives include powdered vegetable fats, such as those supplied by Faravelli, or soy-based whole egg replacers, such as those from Caltech Corp Ltd.

Increasingly, major meat and dairy companies are investing in meat and dairy alternatives, and the egg sector may be about to follow suit. For example, the biggest meat company in the US, Tyson Foods, has started referring to itself as a protein company after investing in meat alternatives, and the nation’s largest dairy company, Dean Foods, continues to invest in a range of non-dairy products. Now, in Europe, Italy-based Eurovo , which distributes eggs and egg products across the continent, plans to begin distribution of an egg replacer from US-based JUST, made from mung bean protein isolate.

Further innovation in animal-free egg alternatives looks likely, as these ingredients tap into such a large number of current trends, including flexitarian and plant-based eating, allergen-free and cruelty-free foods. What is more, egg specialists like Eurovo may be uniquely placed to encourage further developments in plant-based alternatives.

Visit our dedicated 'bakery' news & supplier page

Related news

Preparing for EU organic flavourings crackdown

Preparing for EU organic flavourings crackdown

17 Feb 2020

EU rules governing flavourings in organic foods are set to change in 2021, with many natural flavourings becoming off-limits to food and beverage makers who wish to keep their organic certification. What options will remain open?

Read more 
Innovation in plant-based meat snack alternatives

Innovation in plant-based meat snack alternatives

17 Feb 2020

Interest in meat snacks has risen rapidly over the past few years – but as a growing number of consumers look for plant-based foods, manufacturers have also developed a wide range of snack products that mimic meat.

Read more 
Spotlight on eye health ingredients

Spotlight on eye health ingredients

11 Feb 2020

The market for eye health ingredients and products has been rising over the past few years, as an ageing global population has coincided with increased consumer interest in nutrition-based prevention of age-related conditions.

Read more 
Meat snacks answer consumer protein demand

Meat snacks answer consumer protein demand

11 Feb 2020

Plant-based protein is one of industry’s hottest trends, but broader interest in high protein foods means meat snacking is also on the rise – and the range of convenience meat products available has multiplied.

Read more 
How credible are weight management ingredients?

How credible are weight management ingredients?

3 Feb 2020

Weight management is one of the most in-demand areas for functional ingredients – but some compounds are more promising than others.

Read more 
Low sugar trend boosts bulk sweetener innovation

Low sugar trend boosts bulk sweetener innovation

3 Feb 2020

Use of bulk sweeteners in new products is on the rise, largely driven by consumer interest in sugar-free and lower sugar products.

Read more 
How realistic are sustainable palm oil goals?

How realistic are sustainable palm oil goals?

27 Jan 2020

For many food and beverage companies 2020 was a target for sourcing 100% sustainable palm oil, but few have succeeded. What is holding them back?

Read more 
Spotlight on the health halo of green tea

Spotlight on the health halo of green tea

27 Jan 2020

Green tea has gained an enormous amount of attention for its high antioxidant content, and new studies continue to back multiple benefits for the beverage and its extracts – despite uncertainty over how these benefits are delivered.

Read more 
Could revised calorie content boost nut consumption?

Could revised calorie content boost nut consumption?

20 Jan 2020

Researchers from the USDA have discovered that tree nuts like almonds, cashews and pistachios may have fewer calories than previously thought, and food firms are starting to reflect this on pack. Could fewer calories prompt consumers to eat more nuts?

Read more 
Healthy indulgence: Using fibre to cut sugar in chocolate

Healthy indulgence: Using fibre to cut sugar in chocolate

20 Jan 2020

Fibres have promise for creating reduced sugar products, and a new patented technology based on corn fibre is said to tackle some common technical problems, as well as digestive effects.

Read more